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Redesigned LOMAH system 'aims' to help Soldiers
Bill Tenbusch, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Capability Manger-Live Sustainable Range Program training specialist, explains the inner working of the redesigned Location of Hit and Miss System to Brig. Gen. Michael Lundy, Combined Arms Center-Training deputy commanding general at Range 3 on Fort Eustis, Va., Feb. 5, 2013. By offering immediate results, the new system improves rifle range efficiency and increases training effectiveness, ultimately saving time and supplies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class R. Alex Durbin/Released)
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Redesigned LOMAH system 'aims' to help Soldiers

Posted 2/12/2013   Updated 2/12/2013 Email story   Print story

    


by Airman 1st Class R. Alex Durbin
633rd Air Base Wing Public Affairs


2/12/2013 - FORT EUSTIS, Va.  -- Experts from the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Capability Manager-Live conducted a live-fire demonstration of the redesigned Location of Miss and Hit System, or LOMAH, at Fort Eustis, Va., Feb. 5.

U.S. Army Brig. Gen. Michael Lundy, Combined Arms Center-Training deputy commanding general, attended the event at Fort Eustis' Range 3 to get a first-hand view of the system and its benefits.

The LOMAH system is a computer-controlled projectile detection target system that automatically triangulates shot groups to provide the shooter with corrective data through a wireless local area network, replacing the human method of marking and scoring of Known Distance Live-Fire Exercises.

The system uses acoustic sensors to detect supersonic projectiles within a two-meter radius of a target. The sensors at the target emplacement then relay the results to an Android-based tablet at the firing point, enabling individuals, trainers and coaches to recognize and identify errors and correct them in a more defined and accurate manner.

"Technology is always changing, so we have to continue to be innovative," said Dennis Terry, TCM-Live Sustainable Range Program manager. "If we're not moving forward with technology, we're not doing our Soldiers justice."

The system is designed for the M16 and M4 series weapons, and offers precise adjustments for iron sights, close combat optics or advanced combat optical gun sights. The system even numbers shots based on order, giving shooters the ability to completely track the grouping from the first shot to the last.

By offering immediate results, the new system improves rifle range efficiency and increases training effectiveness, ultimately saving time and ammunition.

The LOMAH system embedded on a qualification range will remove the necessity for shooters to travel to different ranges to zero in their weapons, confirm zero on a known distance range, and qualify on a record fire range.

Soldiers can move more quickly through qualification because each lane is run independently and allows shooters to progress to the next task at their own pace. The LOMAH range has no need for a detail to raise and lower targets to show shooters their performance as currently required on known distance ranges.

An evaluation set to take place later this year will determine if the LOMAH system is suitable for use in home station training.

"There are a great deal of possibilities with this system," said Terry. "LOMAH is a system that can benefit Soldiers greatly in small arms training."



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