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JBLE DBIDS checks increase

By Staff Sgt. Teresa J. Cleveland 633rd Air Base Wing Public Affairs

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Starting Jan. 1, 2015, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, implemented 100% identification card-check policy as part of a new entry control system after months of easing the new system into effect.

The new system, Defense Biometric Identification System, or DBIDS, is a Department of Defense-owned database, implemented at JBLE in July 2014, which uses handheld scanners to determine authorized access to an installation. JBLE security forces personnel initially began using DBIDS for a varied number of users to register all ID cards, ultimately saving time in the future.

"Registration into the system takes roughly three to five seconds, but once registered, it only takes one to two seconds to give results when scanned," said Charlene Campbell, 733rd Security Forces Squadron plans and programs manager. "We tried to implement it slowly so we could get everyone on the installation in the system without it causing too much backup at the gates."

The system uses continuously-updated databases to verify personnel status through means including checking information pertaining to credential status or identifying those who have suspended licenses.

"Since inception, DBIDS has been responsible for denial of base access to unauthorized personnel on almost 1,500 separate occasions; including over 30 individuals who had active criminal warrants," said U.S. Air Force Capt. Michael Warren, 633rd Security Forces Squadron operations officer. "In the majority of these cases, it is unlikely that access would have been denied without the capability that DBIDS brings to the table."

According to Campbell, JBLE has seen an approximated 10 percent increase in notifications of unauthorized individuals.

"The system is notifying us if someone has a warrant out for their arrest, is driving on a suspended license or has an invalid ID card," said Campbell. "We're very pleased to see the system is working and doing what it is supposed to."

Many JBLE patrons may have noticed backups at the gates believed to be caused by the new system, but according to Warren, these backups can be avoided using a few simple steps.

"[Patrons should] have credentials out and ready and avoid merging in and out of lanes to shave a few seconds off their commute," he said. "Also, if one's ID card is becoming unserviceable, have it replaced before the entry controller has to deny your access to the installation."

To alleviate some of the traffic backup, the installations will move from 100 percent implementation during peak hours to a random-numbered amount of vehicles, which changes each day based on traffic flow.

In the future, Warren hopes to see the system continue to improve as new software and equipment is developed, assisting in keeping the installations safe.

"I hope to see increased DBIDS capacity for JBLE as well as updated hardware and software as improved technology becomes available," he said. "DBIDS has proven to be an accurate and crucial force multiplier for our defenders and we greatly appreciate the cooperation and support of the JBLE community as we work together to make the installation a safe and secure place to work and live."

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